- The Filtration Society - http://www.filtsoc.org -

Volume 16, Issue 1

E10 FILTRATION: ITS USE IN GAS TURBINE AIR FILTERS AND THE INFLUENCE OF PULSING ON PERFORMANCE
Edward Owen (pages 36-47)

This paper reports the results of a field trial and active test cell challenging of ISO standard EN1822:2009 E10 grade gas turbine (GT) air intake filter cartridges that were designed to assess the effectiveness of pulsing in an urban location. The field trial took place on an operating gas turbine with filters tested and graded as E10 without pulsing. The test cell was a specially constructed mobile miniature filter house with pulsing capability. Statistical data for ambient environmental conditions and pressure drop at both the filter house and the test cell were recorded. The paper aims to show that current E10 technology is the ideal solution for almost all gas turbine installations as it represents the best compromise for perfect filtration. Included in the current work are product justification, trial site data, portable pulse test cell data, independent standard testing, internal product testing and post usage media analysis.

DIESEL FILTER DIRT HOLDING CAPACITY – THE MISLEADING FACTOR
Bradley Crook (pages 48-51)

The diesel fuel filter business is a multi-billion dollar industry with hundreds of manufacturers around the world producing a wide variety of products for contamination control in diesel engines and for bulk storage and dispensing applications. Competition to produce these filters and gain a slice of this lucrative market is extremely high and as such, manufacturers are continually striving to gain a competitive edge; be it through product innovation or sales and marketing strategies.

One of the more popular strategies of recent times is to advertise the dirt holding capacity of the filter element, simply represented as total weight in grams or ounces. The current paper is intended to provide an insight into this widely used reference factor and will explore the reasons why the average consumer should avoid using such information as a standalone determining factor for filter selection, or as a predictor of actual filter service life.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTICLE, SOLUTE AND MEMBRANE PORE SIZE IN CROSSFLOW FILTRATION
Steve Tarleton (pages 51-60)

Experimental data were obtained using controlled crossflow apparatus for two very different membrane systems. Polymer microfiltration (MF) membranes of differing properties were characterised and used to filter aqueous suspensions carrying colloidal and fine particles of known shape, size, surface charge and chemical composition. By changing the size and size distribution of the feed and the pore size of the membrane in a systematic manner, the influence of the pore/particle size ratio to fouling or cake layer formation is illustrated. By way of contrast the results of some solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) experiments with more hydrophobic membranes and a range of organic solvents and dissolved solutes are also presented. This low fouling system also illustrates the importance of solute size in relation to the size of the transport regions in membranes and presents some interesting correlations with the results obtained for MF.